The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 10

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin Believe it or not, we’ve come to the final installment of The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry. We started with the dawn of mankind, journeyed through Ancient Egypt, Rome and Greece, and made stops in the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Industrial revolution and both World Wars. Now that we know how […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 9

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin In our last installment of The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry, we explored the world of Victorian Era mourning jewelry and how the Industrial Revolution led to more widespread jewelry in synthetic materials, specifically Vulcanite.  The first third of the 20th century also featured synthetic materials and mass production but the most […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 8

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin In the last installment of The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry, you learned that jewelry took an abrupt turn with the advent of leaded glass and paste gems in the 18th century. Well, the 19th century was a crucial time for the development in jewelry history, and all because of three intertwined […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 7

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin You may have noticed throughout all of the previous entries in The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry that with the exception of plating, the history of jewelry leans heavily toward pure metal and genuine gemstones. With the bevy of costume jewelry that you see lining the racks of tween accessory shops and […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 6

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin The Renaissance (14th-17th centuries CE) was a time of unparalleled advancement in secular human thought, art, social policy, scientific experimentation, music and discovery. As the name suggests, the period was rebirth of sorts, ushering in a new age of appreciation for and encouragement of intellectual and cultural pursuits heavily influenced by Ancient […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 5

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin After the fall of Rome, much of the world from fell into an economic and social decline that many historians once referred to as the Dark Ages, lasting from the 5th through 15th centuries CE. Although there were was some cultural and artistic backsliding and a lack of written historical records, archaeological […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 4

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin In Part 3 of The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry, we were introduced to findings and the history of jewelry at the dawn of human civilization, focusing specifically on the incredible jewelry art of ancient Egypt. Ancient Egyptians, however, weren’t the only innovators in the jewelry of early human civilization. As man […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 3

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin If anything is a constant in the history of mankind, it is evolution. Just as humans themselves have evolved, so has nearly everything that the human hand has touched. Over time, innovations in engineering caused simple cave dwellings to metamorphose into luxury high-rise condos. Centuries of genetic engineering have transformed squat, pithy […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 2

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin In Part 1 of The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry, I ended with the notion that around 40,000 years ago, our Eastern European ancestors began carving jewelry out of mammoth tusks and set the stage for the eventual use of gemstones and metals in jewelry-making. While those are both important groups of […]

The Jewelblog’s (Abridged) History of Jewelry: Part 1

Posted · Add Comment

By Katie Austin For most of my college classmates, our introductory Art History class was the perfect backdrop for a mid-afternoon nap or a less-than-discreet texting marathon underneath the vast tables. For me, on the other hand, Art History was anything but a throwaway Gen. Ed. requirement. Every class was like visiting a different museum […]